~Tuesday 19th of June 2018~

Welcome to UkuChords!

Viva La Ukulele

UkuChords brings you the ultimate ukulele chord referencing tool! Very advanced, extremely easy to use and above all completely free. This page shows you the chord diagrams for a very wide array of different chord types. Simply select a root note by clicking on the buttons and then the different chord diagrams show up. Complete with note referencing and fingering to help you as quickly as possible on your to master the ukulele! These are all for default tuning (GCEA), baritone will be added in the future.

Rather view the chords on the ukulele? Change the tuning? See different versions how to play a chord? Click on the "ukulele view" button below. UkuChords also got you covered when you're offline! You can download a A2 poster or A4 PDF document which includes in total 180 chord diagrams for all keys. This is not only available for standard (C) tuning, but also for baritone tuning (links below)!

Root Note

  • A
  • A#
    (Bb)
  • B
  • C
  • C#
    (Db)
  • D
  • D#
    (Eb)
  • E
  • F
  • F#
    (Gb)
  • G
  • G#
    (Ab)

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

How to read chord charts?

The UkuChords chord diagrams are very easy to understand while still containing a ton of information for beginning and advanced ukulele players. To read an ukulele chord diagram you should imagine watching at an ukulele in front of you while you are looking at the fretboard with the headstock at the top and the body at the bottom. The strings are illustrated as vertical lines (from left to right standard G C E A string) and the frets are the horizontal lines.

Different ukulele chord shapes are represented by dots. Each dot represents the placement of your finger and the number inside the dot shows which finger to use. In the example on the right you can see an A major chord. So how should you place your fingers? You play the G string at the second fret with your middle finger and the C string at the first fret with your index finger. The little circle (o) at the top of the E and A strings means that you have to play that string open (i.e. not place a finger on it).

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